Cultural differences in the joy luck club english literature essay

This novel centers on the problems the families deal with as immigrants and the conflicts the mothers' face with their daughters when their daughters have adapt to American culture and have lost Chinese values. In this novel, the four mothers strive to teach their daughters Chinese aspects of life but the daughters have adapt to American culture. The daughters have trouble following their Chinese heritage because it challenges their adaption to American tradition.

Cultural differences in the joy luck club english literature essay

See also Amy Tan Criticism. The Joy Luck Club is Tan's most successful and widely acclaimed novel. It is regarded as a significant achievement in documenting the hardships and struggles of immigrants in America and in portraying the complexities of modern Chinese-American life.

To escape war and poverty, the four mothers emigrate from China to America. In the United States, they struggle to raise their American-born daughters in a vastly different culture. The novel opens with the death of Suyuan Woo, the matriarch of the Joy Luck Club, a social group of women who play the Chinese tile game mah-jongg and rely on each other for support.

Suyuan founded the club in China and later reformed it in San Francisco. Suyuan's daughter, Jing-mei, takes her mother's place at the east side of the club's mah-jongg table. In each relationship, events in the mother's past deeply affect how she identifies with and relates to her daughter.

Because Suyuan lost a husband and was forced to abandon her twin daughters during the Japanese invasion of China, she consistently pushed Jing-mei to succeed and make a better life for herself.

But her mother's high expectations paralyze Jing-mei, who begins to doubt her own talents and abilities. In America, Lindo's daughter Waverly becomes a junior chess champion whose achievements give Lindo a great sense of pride.

Waverly feels that Lindo takes too much credit for her success and, eventually, she accuses her mother of living vicariously through her. This confrontation causes each of them to question their own personal identity and the respect they have for each other.

After her husband leaves her, Ying-Ying is forced to move in with some of her poorer relatives. Ying-Ying's daughter, Lena, is a successful architect, but her husband doesn't value her.

Furthermore, Lena's lifestyle and materialism clash with Ying-Ying's traditional Chinese ways, which she fears will be forgotten. Because of her mother's occupation, young An-mei was raised surrounded by riches, but was not allowed to share in any of the luxuries.

Her mother eventually commits suicide, giving An-mei a way to escape the life of a concubine. Rose Hsu Jordan, An-mei's daughter, struggles with filing divorce papers after her husband leaves her.

Rose's indecisiveness comes from recurring nightmares, inspired by her mother's stories and her mother's assertion that she can read Rose's mind. The novel concludes with Jing-mei, who decides to discover the end of her mother's life story by finding and meeting her abandoned twin half-sisters.

Her aunties give Jing-mei the money she needs to travel to China, affirming the healing effect of storytelling and the very real—if elusive—bond between generations. Major Themes The major theme of The Joy Luck Club concerns the nature of mother-daughter relationships, which are complicated not only by age difference, but by vastly different upbringings.

Cultural differences in the joy luck club english literature essay

The mothers are appalled at their daughters' insolence. They fear that their daughters' desire to achieve the American Dream will prevent them from ever learning about or understanding their Chinese heritage.

Despite these fears, all four of the mothers attempt to give their children the best of both worlds. The power and importance of storytelling is another significant theme in the novel.

The Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan - Essay - leslutinsduphoenix.com

One reason the mother-daughter relationships suffer is that neither generation speaks the language of the other—literally and metaphorically. The mothers try to compensate for this difficulty in communication by relating information through stories. However, most of the stories only frustrate their daughters, who are at a loss to interpret what they really mean.

When the daughters—particularly Jing-mei—are finally able to see the true meaning behind their mothers' tales, they find that the stories are an important form of instruction and comfort.

Issues of self-worth and identity are also central to The Joy Luck Club. All of the women both mothers and daughters wrestle with their past, their present, their ethnicity, their gender, and how they view themselves, as they struggle to construct their own life story and find a place for themselves in the world.

Critical Reception Many critics have asserted that although the characters in The Joy Luck Club are Chinese-American, their struggles have a strong resonance for all people, especially women raised in America. Reviewers have studied the novel from a variety of angles and have generally agreed that the book presents a poignant, insightful examination of not only the generation gap between mothers and daughters, but of the gaps between different cultures as well.

Critics have argued that the book works as an exploration of the issues that are vital to all immigrants in America—including ethnicity, gender, and personal identity.

Some reviewers have identified the mother-daughter relationships in the book as part of a growing tradition of matrilineal discourse that is becoming ever more popular in America.

Others have lauded the multiple perspectives presented in the novel, citing the work's multiple viewpoints as a unique strength that invites analysis on several levels.

One critic has even analyzed the fable-like qualities of The Joy Luck Club, interpreting it as a modern-day fairy tale. Although several reviewers have argued that the novel presents stereotypical portrayals of China and of Chinese people, many critics feel that it addresses important universal issues and themes—common to all, despite their age, race, or nationality.[In the following comparative essay on Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior and Tan's The Joy Luck Club, Ghymn discusses the fable-like quality of The Joy Luck Club and studies how cultural.

The Joy Luck Club study guide contains a biography of Amy Tan, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. About The Joy Luck Club The Joy Luck Club Summary. Get an answer for 'Give some examples of the cultural difference between the mother and the daugters in Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club?' and find homework help for other The Joy Luck Club questions.

The Joy Luck Club Cultural Clashes English Literature Essay The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan surrounds sixteen interweave stories about clashes between Chinese immigrant mothers and their American-raised The Joy Luck Club – Culture Differences Essay The Joy Luck Club, a novel by Amy Tan, is a compilation from eight different women and .

Essays for The Joy Luck Club The Joy Luck Club essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan. Asian American autobiography and the portrayal of Christianity in Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club and Joy Kogawa's Obasan.

” Christianity and Literature 46, No. 2 (Winter ): –

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